Northeast Ohio Northcoast Communities and Neighborhoods


Cleveland is Ohio's center of culture and activity. Sitting on the shores of Lake Erie, Cleveland is about as Midwest as Midwest gets. Part of a megalopolis that includes Akron, Youngstown, Canton and Toledo, Home to three of Ohio's six major professional sports teams, a world-famous orchestra and such new pearls as the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Great Lakes Science Center, the city is keeping up with the world in terms of a modern City. The perfect medley of industry, modernization, culture, diversity, art, and visual stimulants (Such as our skyline) make for the ultimate City. 


Tremont, historically called Cleveland's South side - Directly south of downtown, Tremont is located about five miles from Lake Erie. Tremont is an amalgamation of Mediterranean ethnic groups, with an emphasis on Greek. The Tremont area treats you to some of the best views of downtown Cleveland and the Flats area. You will also enjoy Lincoln Park, with its famed Bathhouse, which has been remodeled into condominiums. The ultimate Tremont dining experience comes in the form of Sokolowski's University Inn, while Dempsey's Oasis Tavern and the Lincoln Park Pub are cornerstones of a burgeoning Tremont night scene. Shops and artistry line the streets, while old homes and inner-city living still exists. While walking at night, you can hear echoes of live music and poetry. Truly the new age of Cleveland for those wanting a twist to the average night out.

Ohio City

Ohio City- Cleveland's most charming and historical district. Birthplace of football legend John Heismann, Ohio City also hosts the Market Square District as well as the West Side Market, both in the range of a century old and both always crowded with visitors. Ohio City is barely five square miles. However, it is home to at least 15 ethnic groups among its 25,000 people. Ohio City is also home to Parker's Restaurant, which is one of Cleveland's finest eateries along with Traci's Restaurant. The Great Lakes Brewing Co. features home brews and fine foods and is one of the more popular places for locals to gather. New construction, and new age condos are popping up all over offering young professionals a location near both the flats, and Downtown night life.

The Flats

The Flats - Located down the hill from downtown on the very near-west side of the city. The clean up of the once-burning Cuyahoga River has coincided with the emergence of this entertainment district. The Flats has been reborn with the rest of the city. Now, highly desirable condos line the Cuyahoga River. Highlighted by such establishments as The Basement, Howl at the Moon Saloon, Shooters on the Water and The Powerhouse (home to several shops and dining establishments), the Flats is where you will find Cleveland's most active nightlife. The recently built Nautica Stage offers outdoor concerts by popular national acts throughout the summer. The Flats is located near the mouth of the Cuyahoga, Taking a lunch cruise on the Goodtime will enable you to view the whole skyline along with the different outdoor establishments. The Cuyahoga River becomes a sidewalk to tourists and Cleveland's own.


Downtown is a place you'll grow to love. It's hard to imagine many places in the world having undergone the type of facelift Cleveland has seen over the past 15 years or so. From it's not so respectable reputation of the early 1980s Downtown has emerged a shiny new lakeside spectacle. A skyline once filled with smokestacks (and smoke) now boasts glowing towers, shiny stadiums, lit bridges, and a host of modern museums and shopping centers. Jacobs Field, Gund Arena and Cleveland Browns Stadium, along with the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum and Great Lakes Science Center, are the architectural and cultural creations that define downtown's rebirth. The Key Tower a skyscraper built since the mid-1980s, joins the 70-year-old Terminal Tower (Tower City, a marbled mall) to give Cleveland a skyline that reflects both its history and its future. With Playhouse Square and its multiple venues just a stone's throw from Public Square, the downtown area will never leave visitors wanting something to do. The recently rehabbed warehouse district (Also known as West 6th.) is now Cleveland's hottest location for night life. Local business owners have transformed the cities historical buildings into unique clubs and restaurants. Locals walk from establishment to establishment never finding the same thing at a new stop. Even in the middle of winter, the air is bubbly and the sounds of street musicians playing their saxophones and the distant aroma of the outdoor gyro stand, offer a feeling of warmth.

Little Italy

Little Italy is a neighborhood with much to offer. Also known as Murray Hill, most locals prefer the more quaint title, which reflects the area's culture. Most of that, not surprisingly, revolves around the culinary. You do not have to look too hard to find a steaming plate of pasta. From Salvatore's Restaurant to Trattoria Roman Gardens to Nido Italia, the Italian food lover will always have a place to satisfy his or her palate. The most popular tourist spot in Little Italy may be the Alta House, an activity center. New luxury condos mix perfectly with the old brick and stone homes. If you're an apartment dweller, this may be the place for you. The Murray Hill Galleries is a shop housing artwork from around the world. The Mayfield District Council Little Italy Museum and Archives is an Italian historical museum, offering glimpses into the nation's past. The yearly festival brings people from all over the country. Coventry Road in Cleveland Heights used to be a haven for the hippies of the 1960s and later the punks in the 1970s; in later days it was home to the Centrum (a grand theatre) and one of Cleveland's important music venues. Cyclists, joggers, and families taking a stroll, are not unfamiliar sites along the flower filled sidewalks.

University Circle